© 2019 by Salty Sailor Productions

The Construction

The Shipyard

  The contract to build the USS Inchon was awarded to the Ingalls Ship Building Corporation a division of Litton Industries, Pascagoula , Mississippi.  The Contract Number was "NOBS-21A"  

Laying The Keel

The laying of the keel of a ship is one of the significant dates in that ship’s life. The date in effect marks the birth of the ship.  The keel of a ship is the “primary fore-and-aft part of a ship’s frame. It runs along the bottom connecting the stem and the stern.” In a wooden or older steel ship, the keel extends the whole length of the vessel. Attached to it are the stem (the foremost steel part forming the bow), sternpost (the upright structural member at the stern) and the ribs of the vessel. This definition reflects how ships were customarily built.  
Nowadays a ship may be built of modules, or blocks, fabricated separately with fittings and equipment inside, then brought together to form the hull and superstructure of the ship.
A keel laying is a significant date, because it customarily marks the start of full production of a ship.
A keel-laying ceremony is an informal affair arranged, for the most part, by the ship’s builder. Traditionally, after gathering and a short address, a section of keel is lowered into place onto a cradle on the ways. The sponsor of the ship or senior naval representative then declares the keel “well and truly laid.” Mementoes (e.g., silver plates, silver hammers) may be presented – these become part of the official artifacts of the ship.
A keel-laying ceremony is an informal affair arranged, for the most part, by the ship’s builder. Traditionally, after gathering and a short address, a section of keel is lowered into place onto a cradle on the ways. The sponsor of the ship or senior naval representative then declares the keel “well and truly laid.” Mementoes (e.g., silver plates, silver hammers) may be presented – these become part of the official artifacts of the ship. 
A keel-laying ceremony traditionally invites good luck in the construction of the ship and throughout her life. Chaplains of various faiths say a few words of blessing that the ship may be protected, and older customs may take place. Elders of other nations may attend. In some navies, one custom has the senior naval representative laying a silver dollar under the keel before it is laid. In other navies, a coin may be laid by the sponsor or the youngest or oldest tradesperson of the shipyard. In the U.S. Navy, the sponsor may be invited to weld her initials onto a metal plate which is placed in the ship. A silver hammer may be used to drive a silver nail into the keel. Whatever the customs, the intent is to keep the ceremony short, simple and in accordance with the traditions of the sea
During a keel-laying a ship is referred to by her builder's hull number in preference to her name, as the ceremony at which the ship is named occurs later with the launching of the ship.   Typically, a plaque with the builder’s name and number is affixed to the back bulkhead of the ship’s bridge.
Hull Number 1156 receiving her Bow section. 
Almost there ......1968

Click on picture to see the Inchon Christning Ceremony